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Hardware Support Discussions related to using various hardware setups with SageTV products. Anything relating to capture cards, remotes, infrared receivers/transmitters, system compatibility or other hardware related problems or suggestions should be posted here.

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  #1  
Old 03-06-2013, 06:53 AM
Paul H Paul H is offline
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Powerline Network Adaptor Kits - Anyone using these?

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...rk+adapter+kit
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  #2  
Old 03-06-2013, 07:25 AM
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I had used an older style kit years ago - it worked in the SD video days - not sure about today. I've found is so much easier, in the end, to just run CAT5e throughout the house - it really isn't that difficult, is a good skill to learn, and will pay back for years and years in the future.
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  #3  
Old 03-06-2013, 07:34 AM
Paul H Paul H is offline
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Same here. They claim that they can do everything, (just like microsloft )
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Old 03-06-2013, 09:52 AM
wayner wayner is offline
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I tried it about 5 years ago but I couldn't get sustained bitrates high enough for HD video so I went to MOCA instead. YMMV as my house is about 60 years old and perhaps the wiring is not clean. I bought units from Motorola NIM-100 units from eBay but Netgear now makes these. So that is an option if you have cable connections by your current network wiring and where you want to have the end point.
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  #5  
Old 03-06-2013, 10:20 AM
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AtariJeff AtariJeff is offline
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I use the TrendNET 200 for my HD200 in the kitchen and it works flawless. I have another one I'm planning on using for 2 HDHR's out in the garage hooked to my OTA antenna.
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  #6  
Old 03-06-2013, 10:22 AM
mdnttoker mdnttoker is offline
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Yeah, I've tried the powerline stuff, never got a consistent high bandwidth connection.

I highly recommend MoCA instead. I started with the NIM's, but those are getting harder to find, and aren't as fast as the new Actiontec's:

Actiontec Ethernet to Coax Adapter Kit for Homes with Cable TV Service (ECB2500CK01)
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  #7  
Old 03-06-2013, 11:15 AM
MattHelm MattHelm is offline
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These are very hit and miss. If you have a good connection, there are the best behind a cat6 cable. BUT, if you don't get a good connection, they are pretty much worthless.

I have a set for one of my IP cameras, and it works, but then the camera isn't always one (5 seconds per picture, I think) and the files are small. (but then WiFi didn't work at all, and couldn't run cable)
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  #8  
Old 03-07-2013, 06:05 PM
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KryptoNyte KryptoNyte is offline
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I tried these from Best Buy and they seemed to work fine, although I only used them for a couple weeks;

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Actionte...ter&cp=1&lp=31

As the other gents mentioned, it's hit or miss depending on your home wiring, so it is nice to be able to purchase locally and return them if they don't work in your home.

Even in the best circumstances, they most certainly did not come close to 500mbits/sec. In fact, they were usually right around 7 megaBYTES per second, so less than a standard 100mbit ethernet.
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  #9  
Old 03-09-2013, 10:20 PM
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Mythikal Mythikal is offline
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I'm using one, but I don't get a good enough connection in most rooms. In the room that gets a "good" connection, I get around 16Mbps down. Not good, but good enough for what I'm using it for.

For other remote locations, I'm using a wireless bridge. This one to be precise. Love it. One of the extenders connected to it just hit 90Mbps down according to iperf.
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  #10  
Old 03-10-2013, 11:21 AM
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TechBill TechBill is offline
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I am using them right now. Ones I have are from Netgear and I been using it for several years.

I used one adapter with HD300 and it playback HD videos fine for us.

But the menu in HD300 does pauses when doing fast scrolling however it is not too bad at all.

I also use one for my printer since the wifi hardware on it finally quit working with no issues.

You just need a good connection between outlet, in the middle led on the adapter if it lights up then you got a good solid connection but it if blinking or no light then you will have a hit and miss connection and speed will drop.

Sometime trying a different outlet in same room will give you a better connection than the previous outlet.

Bill
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  #11  
Old 03-10-2013, 03:58 PM
Paul H Paul H is offline
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Thanks to everyone for the informative replies. I was wondering what was being used instead of WiFi.
Just for the record, the first device I used (just for analog TV and 2 channel audio), was called a LeapFrog it used the home telephone wiring, not a great product.
Now I'm using a RF-Link, also analog, it transmits/recieves video/audio at 5.8GHz - it also can retransmit IR remote controls. I use it to 'slave' a 10" TV in the master bathroom, (I didn't want to run a cable) to the TV in the master bedroom.
I also use two balun boxes to send info from my media room to my office/workshop via CAT5 then to a distribution amp and then to my workbench, shop TV and master bedroom (as backup).
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  #12  
Old 03-10-2013, 06:08 PM
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A large part of whether the powerline networking is going to work for you has to do with whether each end of your intended network is on the same half of the house's power system. North american residential wiring uses a split phase power system, so you have a neutral and two opposite hot legs. The powerline network basically generates 'noise' on the hot leg - so that means if your two network devices are on opposite legs, there is very little transmission of signal. Then, when a 220V appliance comes on (which is run from tapping off both hot legs), all of a sudden, you have network connectivity - as that appliance bridges the noise across the two halves.
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  #13  
Old 03-11-2013, 04:12 PM
Paul H Paul H is offline
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X10 used to make a 'bridge' that you placed on the 220V line to fix that problem. If I remember correctly it was a capacitor that was connected between the hot legs.
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  #14  
Old 03-11-2013, 06:10 PM
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Yes, that type of thing would likely work as well for this, but it's a bit higher frequency than the X10 signal, and likely needs to be just the right size cap. either way - it you're comfortable wiring a cap into your main electrical panel, my guess is you'd be better off just running CAT 5e where you need network.
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unRAID Server: i7-6700, 32GB RAM, Dual 128GB SSD cache and 13TB pool, with SageTVv9, openDCT, Logitech Media Server and Plex Media Server each in Dockers.
Sources: HRHR Prime with Charter CableCard. HDHR-US for OTA.
Primary Client: HD-300 through XBoxOne in Living Room, Samsung HLT-6189S
Other Clients: Mi Box in Master Bedroom, HD-200 in kids room
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  #15  
Old 03-11-2013, 09:55 PM
mgpaulus mgpaulus is offline
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So since I have a gas Dryer, and a gas stove/oven, that's probably why I could never get a good signal using a powerline kit?
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  #16  
Old 03-11-2013, 11:02 PM
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Fuzzy Fuzzy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgpaulus View Post
So since I have a gas Dryer, and a gas stove/oven, that's probably why I could never get a good signal using a powerline kit?
possibly - it would depend on whether you got lucky and the outlets in question were on the same half of the power or not. there are usually ways to work around it, by swapping breakers around in the panel.
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unRAID Server: i7-6700, 32GB RAM, Dual 128GB SSD cache and 13TB pool, with SageTVv9, openDCT, Logitech Media Server and Plex Media Server each in Dockers.
Sources: HRHR Prime with Charter CableCard. HDHR-US for OTA.
Primary Client: HD-300 through XBoxOne in Living Room, Samsung HLT-6189S
Other Clients: Mi Box in Master Bedroom, HD-200 in kids room
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  #17  
Old 03-12-2013, 05:24 AM
ranger ranger is offline
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I currently use the TPLink 211's for our bedroom TV and they work fine. As noted, you have to be on the right circuits to make it work.
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  #18  
Old 03-14-2013, 05:21 PM
weeber weeber is offline
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I'm currently using the Netgear 500Mbps models, and recently upgraded from the Cisco 200Mbps models. Both versions ran awesome in my house. I use them to connect an HD Homerun/router/NAS in my "network room", my desktop downstairs, and my HTPC/PS3 in the living room. My 200Mbps setup would usually transfer files between 3.5-4 MB/s (according to Win7 file transfer) between the desktop and HTPC. The newer 500Mbps setup is usually between 6.5-7 MB/s. Doesn't match a pure network, but more than suitable for my needs. I can record 2 1080i programs from the HDHomerun to the HTPC and play online with my PS3, no problems. My connections do not drop, nor noticeably degrade when electronic appliances are running, even the dryer. I know at least one of my three powerline adapters are on a different leg the than the others, but I'm not sure which. I'm definitely a proponent for this tech.

The thing about powerline networking is that each house is unique, it totally depends on your home's wiring and how good it is. Even homes built at the same time, in the same neighborhood, can have completely different results. I say give them a try, but be prepared to return in case they don't work.

I do have to be careful not to saturate the network. For instance, if I know I'm recording shows using the HDHR (especially 2 at once), I make a note not to start a large file transfer. Doing that would saturate the bandwidth and cause corruptions in the recordings. I think I have the QoS settings tweaked to prevent this now, but I'm still careful about it.

Be sure to check out smallnetbuilder.com. They have lots of reviews and performance charts for powerline networking, plus some good additional info about getting the most out of them. Unfortunately I don't think they review the TP-Link products you mentioned.
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  #19  
Old 03-15-2013, 09:29 AM
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AtariJeff AtariJeff is offline
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Can you mix and match the different models and speeds among the same manufacturer?
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  #20  
Old 03-15-2013, 01:01 PM
bmac.to bmac.to is offline
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It depends - there are more than one silicon provider for these products - the most common is Qualcomm (was Atheros, was Intellon). If you buy a product that says 500MBit, than the silicon is from Qualcomm and all products from all vendors will work well together.

At the 200MBit rate, there are several silicon providers but if they say HomeplugAV, they should work together. Some products support a competing standard and will not work with HomeplugAV products.

The newest products (not sure they are available for retail yet) solve many of the issues mentioned above - if you look, most powerline products only have a line/neutral plug (in NA anyways). The newest one also include a ground pin and will pick the best "channel". This improves greatly the issue with weaker coupling between phases, and also issues with arc-fault breakers.
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